Posts Tagged ‘NFL Draft’

  • Jets – Trevor Lawrence, Clemson QB – Lawrence is widely considered to be the best quarterback in the class. Only him or Fields would really make any sense at number one.
  • Jaguars – Justin Fields, Ohio State QB – Fields is a strong downfield thrower who rarely turns the ball over.
  • Bengals – Ja’Marr Chase, LSU WR – Chase is the draft’s best receiver, and Burrow’s teammate in 2019 at LSU.
  • Cowboys – Penei Sewell, Oregon OL – Jerry has invested heavily in the offensive line. Because of injuries and departures the Cowboys no longer field a strong group up front. Sewell is this years’ Quenton Nelson.
  • Football Team – Trey Lance, North Dakota State QB – Lance’s ceiling is sky high and lets Washington start over.
  • Chargers – Jaylen Waddle, Alabama WR – The Bolts need to upgrade their offensive line, but this is an opportunity to draft an elite wide receiver.
  • Giants – Micah Parsons, Penn State LB – The Giants have an identity on defense and don’t want to move on from Daniel Jones yet.
  • Dolphins (from Texans) – Devonta Smith, Alabama WR – Tua gets a familiar face and an elite receiver.
  • Falcons – Christian Barmore, Alabama DT – The Falcons defense continues to be a liability. Barmore and Jarrett could be powerful together.
  • Panthers – Zach Wilson, BYU QB – Teddy’s been impressive in the Panthers’ offense. Wilson could learn from his mentorship and give the Panthers a bigger arm while still throwing with accuracy.
  • Lions – Patrick Surtain II, Alabama CB – It’s tough to predict whether Quinn/Patricia will be in town for the 21 draft. I think Surtain is a great value pick here no matter who is drafting.
  • Patriots – Dylan Moses, Alabama LB – We all know New England needs to draft a quarterback. Belichick feels at home drafting defense. Patriots might go cornerback here, Belichick loves his corners.
  • Vikings – Caleb Farley, Virginia Tech CB – Minnesota’s regretting the guaranteed money Cousins contract. Farley address a deep need in the Vikings defense.
  • 49ers – Elijah Moore, Ole Miss WR – Moore is on fire. He’s a slot receiver, but Shanahan will know better than anyone how to get him down the field.
  • Broncos – Gregory Rousseau, Miami DE – A stud pass rusher, Rousseau can alleviate the loss of Von Miller.
  • Bears – Mac Jones, Alabama QB – The Bears will never be competitive until they get a real quarterback.
  • Dolphins – Kwity Paye, Michigan DL – Paye can line up at End or Tackle. Flores will value Paye’s versatility.
  • Ravens – Richard LeCounte, UGA DB – LeCounte can offset the loss of Earl Thomas, and the Ravens’ secondary is generally not the strongest.
  • Eagles – Alex Leatherwood, Alabama OT – The Eagles have spent high picks on offensive linemen, but they always seem to be injured. No quarterback will succeed in that offense until they have a healthy, strong offensive line. Leatherwood has been Alabama’s left tackle for two seasons now.
  • Cardinals – Travis Etienne, Clemson RB – I know Etienne is a running back, but he would make Arizona so much tougher to defend.
  • Raiders – Rondale Moore, Purdue WR – Moore forces the defense to prepare for a multitude of different options. He’s a deep threat, he takes balls out of the backfield, he has great lateral agility.
  • Jaguars (From Rams) – Chris Olave, Ohio State WR – Assuming the Jaguars get an offensive coach, Olave is a premium slot receiver Fields is comfortable passing to.
  • Colts – Kyle Trask, Florida QB – The Colts are thriving with old man Rivers who may not be back next year.
  • Browns – Shaun Wade, OSU CB – The Browns offense is humming at about its peak. Wade is a value pick here.
  • Jets (From Seahawks) – Jalen Mayfield, Michigan OT – Joe Douglas will want a strong o-line for Lawrence. Mayfield has performed well as a pass protector and can start at right tackle right away.
  • Titans – Patrick Jones II, Pitt DT – The Titans are pretty strong all around. Jones is an excellent interior pass rusher to help Tennessee compete with Kansas City.
  • Buccaneers – Jay Tufele, USC DT – Tufele could finally take over for Suh as an elite interior pass rusher. He’s got the size and pass rushing chops to compete.
  • Bills – Jaycee Horn, SC CB – The Bills defense hasn’t looked as strong in 2020, and Levi Wallace may not return in ’21.
  • Packers – Rashod Bateman, Minn. WR – The Packers can go ahead and finally draft a wide receiver. Bateman is a deep threat.
  • Chiefs – Terrace Marshall Jr, LSU WR – The Chiefs can go any direction here. Marshall would give them some height outside of Kelce.
  • Saints – Kyle Pitts, UF TE – Whoever plays quarterback in 2021 for New Orleans will value the drafts’ best tight end. Pitts is an athlete and has plus height/wingspan, ideal for a younger QB.
  • Steelers – Chazz Surratt, UNC LB – The Steelers typically prioritize the front seven early in the draft. Surratt’s a playmaker who could transition to strong safety if needs be.

Other names to watch for: Christian Darrisaw – VT OL, Justyn Ross – Clemson WR, Wyatt Davis – OSU OL, Amon-Ra St. Brown – USC WR, Trevon Moehrig TCU S.

ruggs

Henry Ruggs’ twitter profile photo

I HAVE NO IDEA

  • Henry Ruggs III recorded the fastest 40 in the combine at 4.27.
  • He also tied for the second highest vertical (regardless of position) at 42 inches. This means Ruggs will be more competitive for jump balls even against taller DBs. For frame of reference, Bengals John Ross (speedster who ran 40 yard dash of 4.22) jumped a vertical of 37 inches).
  • Henry Ruggs registered only 1 drop (against 40 receptions). Previous deep threat receivers, John Ross, Darrius Heyward-Bey, struggled with drops.
  • Raiders general manager Mike Mayock cited Ruggs’ speed in an interview and his ability to open up the run game by drawing defenders to him.
  • Ruggs has the second largest hands in the Combine amongst wide receivers (10 1/8″). He has larger hands than 6’6″ Collin Johnson, 6’4″ Chase Claypool, and several others. John Ross (record holder for 40 yard dash) had 8 3/4 inch hands. Darrius Heyward Bey had 9 inch hands.

Ruggs is not just be the “speed” receiver that he’s been advertised to be. His hand size, impressive vertical, surgical hands make him a highly attractive player to have on a team. “Silver and Black Films Presents” did a great job breaking down why Henry Ruggs is a good fit for the Raiders offense.

The 49ers may have had Ruggs as their number one receiver

The 49ers had an established need for a receiver after starter Emmanuel Sanders left in free agency, so they would’ve had impetus to replace him. They had the opportunity to draft CeeDee Lamb or Jerry Jeudy, but instead drafted defensive tackle Javon Kinlaw, shortly after Vegas drafted Ruggs. The 49ers reportedly had been in touch with Henry Ruggs quite a bit before the draft, and may have had Ruggs as their number one receiver and chose to draft a defensive player when Ruggs was already taken.

Ruggs is an easy guy to root for, watching him in interviews he’s very personable and genuine.

 

 

 

  1. Tampa Bay Buccaneers  – Jameis Winston, Florida State QB -Winston played in a pro style offense at Florida State and had repeated success on a big stage winning a heisman and national championship in 2013. Winston will become the face of the franchise for the next two to three seasons for better or worse.
  2. Tennessee Titans – Marcus Mariota, Oregon QB – Mariota’s a star talent at the QB position. Titans head coach Ken Whisenhunt himself said Mariota would be a day one starter if he comes to Tennessee at number two. If the Titans don’t trade the pick expect them to take Mariota here at number two.
  3. Jacksonville Jaguars – Dante Fowler, Florida OLB –  Fowler fits the pure pass rusher mold Coach Bradley wants for this defense.
  4. Oakland Raiders – Leonard Williams, USC DT – Leonard Williams is the best player in the draft. The Raiders have a no-brainer pick here.
  5. Washington Redskins – Vic Beasley, Clemson OLB/DE – Washington needs a pass rusher. Beasley has a successful track record of getting after the quarterback and the physical prowess coaches and GM’s like in a first round pick.
  6. New York Jets – Randy Gregory, Nebraska OLB/DE – Gregory’s ability to both rush the passer and cover opposing receivers make him valuable on Todd Bowles’ defense.
  7. Chicago Bears – Kevin White, West Virginia WR – White can step in and immediately replace and improve on Brandon Marshall’s production from 2014..
  8. Atlanta Falcons – Shane Ray, Missouri OLB/DE – Atlanta needed a first round caliber pass rusher this time last season. They chose to address other needs early in the draft. Ray showed he’s a consistently dominant defender with over fourteen sacks in the 2014 season against big time SEC competition.
  9. New York Giants – Brandon Scherff, Iowa OL – The Giants were the 30th ranked team in run blocking efficiency according to profootballfocus.com during the 2014 season. Young runner Andre Williams will need more help than an underperforming John Jerry to bring balance to the Giants offense. The Giants could take Amari Cooper here, but adding Scherff would help re-establish Giants football from the late 00’s that was so successful.
  10. St. Louis Rams – Amari Cooper, Alabama WR – The Rams need offensive line help, but Amari Cooper would be an enormous gain for St. Louis. The Rams desperately need a true number one receiver.
  11. Minnesota Vikings – DeVante Parker, Louisville WR – The best wide receiver available at this pick. Parker carries the bonus of having played with Vikings QB Teddy Bridgewater at Louisville which should help him develop a rapport with the passer quickly. Parker is a big target with soft hands and only three drops since 2012.
  12. Cleveland Browns – Danny Shelton, Washington DT – The Browns have other needs, but Shelton is a monster at a position of need for Cleveland. Stopping the run will be hugely important if Cleveland wants to win division games.
  13. New Orleans Saints – Malcom Brown, Texas DT – Brown, like Shelton, displayed dominance as both a run defender and pass-rusher. He would be drastic upgrade for New Orleans on the defensive line.
  14. Miami Dolphins – Bud Dupree, Kentucky OLB/DE – Dupree as a physical specimen isn’t too far off of Houston’s Jadeveon Clowney. Dupree can learn from the grizzled veteran Cameron Wake and replace him in future seasons.
  15. San Francisco 49ers – Arik Armstead, Oregon DE – The 49ers have many needs. Armstead should help San Francisco re-establish dominance in the front seven with the potential loss of Justin Smith. Armstead has experience in a 3-4 defense with impressive conditioning. Armstead looks like a more polished Ziggy Ansah coming out of college.
  16. Houston Texans – Landon Collins, Alabama FS – Houston has other needs, but Collins would join a secondary in need of quality safeties. Neither Swearinger nor Rahim Moore blew anyone away with their performance last season. Houston already has a stout front seven, Collins would provide more security on the back end of the defense.
  17. San Diego Chargers – La’el Collins, LSU G/T – Collins demonstrated he can both pass-protect and run block while playing left tackle at LSU. Collins could likely play guard at San Diego or possibly right tackle and maybe be groomed to down the road replace King Dunlap.
  18. Kansas City Chiefs – Ereck Flowers, Miami OT – Young Eric Fisher didn’t come in and play great last season. Ereck Flowers can solidify the right tackle spot or push Eric Fisher at left tackle. The Chiefs also have need for a wide receiver and center.
  19. Cleveland Browns (through Buffalo) – Eric Kendricks, UCLA ILB – Adding pieces to a front seven that can defend better against the run will be important for their jockeying for position in the AFC North. Kendricks plays athletically (though a little undersized) and should stabilize the run defense like he did at UCLA. Kendricks can also drop into coverage well.
  20. Philadelphia Eagles – Trae Waynes, Michigan State CB – Philadelphia just added Byron Maxwell in free agency. Maxwell had a great 2014, but was never great without starting next to Richard Sherman. If Trae Waynes can live up to expectations, he would give Philadelphia a formidable duo at corner. At worst, Waynes can be a valuable nicker corner while grooming under more seasoned players. Waynes demonstrated the ability to play press coverage and to cover well in space.
  21. Cincinnati Bengals – Eddie Goldman, Florida State DT – Goldman can replace the struggling Domata Peko at DT
  22. Pittsburgh Steelers – Jalen Collins, LSU CB – The steelers are losing defensive backs left and right. They needed depth in the secondary before Ike Taylor retired. Collins has plus size and will compete better against A.J. Green and the league’s taller receivers.
  23. Detroit Lions – Marcus Peters, Washington CB – Peters is the most talented player on the board here.
  24. Arizona Cardinals – Kevin Johnson, Wake Forest CB – Arizona needs a top corner to stabilize the secondary after a shaky season from Patrick Peterson and the departure of Antonio Cromartie
  25. Carolina Panthers – Andrus Peat, Stanford, OT – Carolina had a monster need for wide receivers and offensive tackles last season. They drafted Kelvin Benjamin, but took no tackles in the draft. Peat is a top athlete at his position. Peat’s experience playing against top-level competition and high praise qualifies him as a draft steal at number twenty-five.
  26. Baltimore Ravens – Jaelen Strong, ASU WR – Strong is a big, athletic target who should be able to more than replace what Baltimore lost with Torrey Smith’s defecting to San Francisco this offseason.
  27. Dallas Cowboys – Todd Gurley, Georgia RB – Gurley’s play is unbelievable. He has bruising size ( 6’,1” 231 lbs), plus speed (evidenced by two kickoff returns for touchdowns) and skillful hands (37 catches for 441 yards and 6 receiving TD’s in 2013). There is concern of injury. But if Gurley can stay healthy, he can easily be the next big thing at running back.
  28. Denver Broncos – T.J. Clemmings, Pittsburgh OT – Denver needs a true right tackle to replace struggling Chris Clark. Denver has a future with C.J. Anderson at running back and are preparing to have Brock Osweiler take over the reigns as passer in 2016. Both players will need a strong offensive line to support them. Drafting Clemmings is an investment for the future and for 2015.
  29. Indianapolis Colts – Jake Fisher, Oregon OT – Gosder Cherilus struggled at offensive tackle last season. The Colts can again use some help against the run. Taking an offensive tackle here will give Andrew Luck better protection. Fisher has experience both at left and right tackle at Oregon.
  30. Green Bay Packers – Shaq Thompson, Washington ILB – Thompson’s size (228 lbs) has some teams projecting him at safety. If Thompson can cover and play the run Green Bay can work around his size. Letting go A.J. Hawk and Brad Jones at linebacker and seeing Seattle run right through Green Bay’s defense in last season’s NFC championship game creates a need for an athlete like Thompson.
  31. New Orleans Saints – Cameron Erving, Florida State C/G – The Saints sent Guard Ben Grubbs to Kansas City in a trade and watched as former pro bowler Jahri Evans struggled mightily this season. The Saints are clearly making way for the future. Reestablishing a strong offensive line will be essential for the rebuilding project for the Saints. Erving is a fine athlete with experience at Guard and Center.
  32. New England Patriots – P.J. Williams, Florida State CB – NFL scouts are high on Byron Jones for his athleticism. Bill Belichick has stated time and time he again he values: “football players” over size/speed guys. Williams played big at Florida State’s national championship game and can contribute immediately on Belichick’s defense.

Draft philosophy truth

Posted: April 6, 2014 in Football, New entries
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I recently finished reading an article on bleacher report about drafting the “safe pick.” It more or less states there aren’t safe picks and widely held beliefs about the topic are wrong. Here are some takeaways –

– OL/DL are the second most likely positions in the NFL to be busts. Offensive linemen in particular have a reputation for being “safe” picks. Wide receivers unsurprisingly are the most likely to bust.

– “Physical specimens” can be busts in the NFL. History’s shown us Robert Gallery and Aaron Curry as examples of players with “physical beast” potential who simply can’t handle the transition.

– No position or trait guarantees a player will succeed at the next level. Schalter summed it up nicely with this quote:

“Ultimately, the biggest factor in whether a player succeeds or fails in the NFL isn’t his height, weight, college stats, workout numbers, teammate testimonials, clean urine or clean bill of health. It’s whether the team that drafts him understands his strengths and weaknesses and will put him in a position to maximize those strengths and minimize those weaknesses.” – Ty Schalter, NFL National Lead Writer, bleacherreport.com.

The Cleveland Browns have been a franchise in turmoil for the past several years. In 2013, they fired their head coach after another embarrassing 4-12 season. But the front office showed some promise. They sent young power running back Trent Richardson to Indianapolis for a first round pick. Hindsight has shown that Cleveland came out of that transaction as the clear victor. They start the 2014 season with former Bills defensive coordinator Mike Pettine running the show as head coach and two first round picks, one in the top five. In a shaky AFC North, Cleveland will become one of the AFC’s heavyweights and enter the playoffs taking the NFL by surprise with a veteran defense and balanced offense.

Pillars on defense:

Joe Haden, CB

Haden’s established himself as one of the league’s top corners. He doesn’t get the attention that Richard Sherman or Aqib Talib get because his team never ends up in the playoffs, nor does he run his mouth after a big win.

Donte Whitner, SS

Whitner replaces departed defensive back T.J. Ward. Whitner is a tough defender who will bring a high level of physicality to the defense.

Karlos Dansby, ILB

Dansby’s a seasoned veteran who brings leadership to replace the departed D’Qwell Jackson. Dansby’s shown he can be effective rushing the passer, in coverage, and against the run. He was a defensive powerhouse last season in Arizona and will make an enormous difference in Cleveland in 2014.

Pillars on offense:

Joe Thomas and Alex Mack, OL

Thomas is the most consistent left tackle in football. He hasn’t missed a start in seven seasons for Cleveland and always performs at a high level. Mack is one of the league’s top centers and unless he finds his way out of Cleveland he will be the leader of the offensive in line in 2014.

Josh Gordon, WR

Gordon took the league by storm last season by leading the league in receiving yards, even missing two games during the season, and having questionable at best quarterbacks throwing him the ball. If Cleveland can find a stable and competent QB situation, Gordon can blossom even further.

Jordan Cameron, TE

Cameron broke out this past season catching eighty passes for over 900 yards. Cameron’s presence on the team will make him a “safety valve” for a rookie or journeyman Quarterback in 2014.

Ben Tate, RB

Tate’s been a caged tiger his first five seasons in the NFL. Houston drafted him to be the starting running back, but suffered from an embarrassment of riches at the position as Arian Foster stepped up and outplayed even Tate at the position. Tate is only 25 years old and doesn’t have the wear and tear that other starting backs have at that age.

The Draft:

Sources trusted by NFL.com say Cleveland plans to spend their first pick in the draft on a non-passer (Clowney, Sammy Watkins, Khalil Mack, Jake Matthews, etc) and a later pick on a passer. If Clowney is not available, Cleveland may look to take Khalil Mack out of Buffalo. Mike Pettine made his name by rushing the passer at Buffalo so it makes sense for him to take well-crafted QB hunter like Mack or Clowney. Whether they select Clowney or Mack, they get out of the top ten with one of the draft’s elite pass-rushers.

If QB Derek Carr gets drafted by Oakland, Cleveland will have to settle for a passer like Zach Mettenberger, A.J. McCarron, or Jimmy Garoppolo. Mettenberger has ideal size for the position and a good combination of big-game experience and admirable passing statistics.

Other major needs Cleveland will likely address in the draft include right guard and wide receiver.

Cleveland can elect to use their late first round pick on a top-tier receiver like Brandin Cooks, Kelvin Benjamin, or Marqise Lee. Doing so would fill a major need for Cleveland and give their QB a variety of deep threats to choose from.

Cleveland should be able to select a guard later on in the draft in the caliber of Cyril Richardson from Baylor or Dakota Dozier from Furman to start right away at right guard.

The final product:

At the start of the regular season, the Browns’ starting lineup could look something like this:

QB: Zach Mettenberger
RB: Ben Tate
FB: Chris Ogbonnaya
LT: Joe Thomas
LG: John Greco
Center: Alex Mack
RG: Cyril Richardson
RT: Mitchell Schwartz
WR1: Josh Gordon
WR2: Marqise Lee
TE: Jordan Cameron

A receiving trio of Gordon, Lee AND Cameron, coupled with Ben Tate at running back makes Cleveland’s offense the most complete in the AFC North (considering Baltimore’s offensive collapse in 2013 and their total lack of receiving options).

Looking at Cleveland’s defense:

DE: Ahtyba Rubin
NT: Phil Taylor
DE: John Hughes
OLB: Khalil Mack
ILB: Karlos Dansby
ILB: Craig Robertson
OLB: Jabaal Sheard (Barkevious Mingo could step up and take this role if Coach Pettine feels he’s ready)
CB1: Joe Haden
CB2: Buster Skrine
SS: Donte Whitner
FS: Tashaun Gipson

Outside of an almost unknown defensive line, Cleveland can field a strong defense in 2014.

  • Tashaun Gipson nabbed five interceptions last season and will be part of a very talented secondary.

  • DT Phil Taylor, a product of the Julio Jones trade Atlanta made to move up in the draft back in 2011 has been a rock in the middle of the defensive line ever since.

  • CB Buster Skrine, not well known outside of Cleveland, has made enormous strides at the CB position since his first two seasons. Skrine may not ever end up in the highlight reel for sportscenter, but he’s provided consistent and reliable corner play in 2013.

With players like Barkevious Mingo, Khalil Mack, and Karlos Dansby, Mike Pettine can orchestrate his patented blitzing patterns and unlock Cleveland’s potential.

A balanced offense paired with a defense spearheaded by Joe Haden, Khalil Mack, and Donte Whitner will put Cleveland in the spotlight next season. This team will be in the playoffs.

NFL Draft mancrushes

Posted: March 2, 2014 in Football, New entries
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Aaron Donald, DT Pittsburgh

285 lbs. 6’ 3/4”

Official 40 time – 4.68 (Only defensive tackle to finish among the top 15 of defensive linemen in the 40)

Bench press performance – 35 reps (Second among all defensive linemen in bench press)

Stat line – Aaron Donald finished an impressive college career at Pitt with eleven sacks as an interior defensive lineman.

Best fit(s): Dallas, Chicago, Green Bay

Donald initially worried scouts because he’s shorter than the prototypical 6’4”-6’5” size for DT’s. His performance in the Senior Bowl brought him to the forefront of the football world. His work ethic and explosiveness more than make up for any lack of height. His dominant showing in the combine has him being taken in the first round by pundits. Dallas fans now hope he will still be available when their team drafts in the first.

Bishop Sankey, RB Washington

203 lbs. 5’ 10”

Official 40 time – 4.49

Bench press performance – 26 reps (Second among all RB’s in combine only to ManBeast Jerick Mckinnon.

Stat line – Pac-12’s leading rusher with 1,870 yards in the 2013 season.

Best fit(s): Arizona, Tennessee, Jacksonville

Sankey’s a slightly undersized but quick back. His performance in the bench press suggests he’ll be a hard tackle to make. Sankey’s shown he can handle a full workload, and has the strength and size to compete at a professional level.

Khalil Mack, OLB Buffalo

251 lbs. 6’ 3”

Official 40 time – 4.65

Bench press performance – 23 reps (tied for 11th among linebackers)

Stat line – 10.5 sacks on the season. Including 2.5 and an INT against Ohio State in season opener.

Best fit(s): Tampa Bay, Jacksonville, Chicago

A top ten selection. Mike Mayock proclaimed Mack would be his first selection in the draft were he a GM today. Fascinating athlete from a small school. Would be a thorough disappointment if he didn’t shout: “Mack attack!” before sacking opposing QBs in the NFL.

Austin Seferian-Jenkins, TE Washington

262 lbs. 6’ 5”

Did not participate in 40

Bench press performance – 20 reps

Stat line – Although he had a quiet junior season, Jenkins had 69 catches for 852 yards and seven scores as a sophomore.

Best fit(s): New England, Seattle, Kansas City, Buffalo

Jenkins’ combination of size, strength, and pass catching ability will make him a fearsome target at the next level. Eric Ebron and Jace Amaro are lauded for their athletic ability and speed. They are both excellent tight ends and likely have a bright future in the NFL. While Jenkins may not have the same devastating straight-line speed as Ebron or Amaro, his physicality and competitive spirit mean he could be the second coming of Rob Gronkowski if he goes to a team willing to pass him the ball.

Pat O’Donnell, P Miami

220 lbs. 6’ 4”

Official 40 time: 4.64

Bench press performance – 23 reps

Stat line – Booted it 50+ yards in eight consecutive games to close out his college career.

Best fit(s): Minnesota, Washington, Chicago

O’Donnell is a punter but has the physicality of a first-round wide receiver/tight end. Occasionally punters have to make the touchdown saving tackle. O’Donnell’s conditioning and powering leg will likely make him a valuable late round selection.

Stanley Jean-Baptiste, CB Nebraska

218 lbs. 6’ 3”

Official 40 time: 4.61

Bench press performance: 13 reps

Stat line: Twenty-one PBUs (pass breakups) and six INT’s in only seventeen starts at Nebraska.

Best fit(s): Minnesota, San Diego, St. Louis

Jean-Baptiste is a converted receiver who has spent less than two years at the corner position. His size and weight should serve him well as teams look to emulate Seattle’s tremendous success with larger, more physical corners. Jean-Baptiste’s 40 time, while acceptable considering his size will make teams hesitant to spend an early pick on him. Jean-Baptiste can be a force in the secondary if he can polish his coverage skills and turn on a swivel.

Will Sutton, DT Arizona State  

303 lbs. 6’ 0”

Official 40 time: 5.36

Bench press performance: 24 reps

Stat line: Two-time first-team AP All-American, Two-time Pac-12 Defensive Player Of The Year, and two-time first-team All-Pac-12 selection.

Best fit(s): New England, Oakland, Tampa Bay

Sutton is like a version of Aaron Donald from an alternate universe where he gains fifteen pounds of fat his Senior year and his draft performance suffers for it. To be fair to Sutton, he likely grew tired of reading and hearing about how he was “undersized” and “too small” to play DT at the next level. Either way his performance does seem to have dropped off from where he was a year ago at a svelte 288 lbs. If Sutton can regain his 2012-form, he can be a Warren Sapp-type defensive threat at the next level.